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Weekly Highlights

MEMORANDUM

From: Gabrielle Boudreaux Bodin
Subject: Weekly Highlights, USGS National Wetlands Research Center, June 16, 2011  

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Departmental/Bureau News - Current

  • Land Change Map Presentation to the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) Task Force:  USGS National Wetlands Research Center Deputy Director Matthew Andersen addressed the CWPPRA Task Force at a public meeting on the morning of June 8, 2011, in Lafayette, La.  The subject of the presentation was a new land change map for coastal Louisiana, USGS SIM 3164. Andersen discussed the science used to create the map and shared information about how the data could be useful for coastal wetland resource managers.    (Matthew Andersen; Lafayette, La.; 337-266-8501)

  • Aviation Safety Training Held: Aviation safety training was held at the USGS National Wetlands Research Center June 13 – 15, 2011. The training, presented by Blaine Moriarty of DOI Aviation Management Directorate (AMD), was for managers and employees. Aviation program elements were also reviewed. Program personnel from the AMD, Frank Crump III and Bill James, were present to help with the role DOI takes in aspects of aircraft use at the NWRC. (John McCoy; Lafayette, La.; 337-266-8627)

  • Land Change Map Discussed at CPRA Meeting: The new USGS National Wetlands Research Center land change map was on the agenda for discussion for the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority’s June 15, 2011, meeting. The chairman of the CPRA, Garret Graves, explained the map and its application to future coastal restoration efforts. Graves also announced that NWRC would provide a more detailed presentation on the map at their next meeting on July 20. NWRC Deputy Director Matthew Andersen attended the meeting. (Matthew Andersen; Lafayette, La.; 337-266-8501)

  • Youth to Visit NWRC: Approximately 25 residents of the Children’s Shelters of Acadiana Youth will visit the USGS National Wetlands Research Center on June 21, 2011, to learn about Louisiana’s coastal wetlands and research being conducted at NWRC. They will view a presentation and tour the center. The mission of Acadiana Youth, Inc. is to provide a safe, loving home environment for abused and troubled youth, while offering a broad range of therapeutic, educational, and recreational services. (Gabrielle Bodin; Lafayette, La.; 337-266-8655)

Agency Work on Presidential Initiatives

  • NWRC Continues Work with Task Force: USGS personnel continue to support development of guidance documents for the President's Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force. USGS personnel Alyssa Daussman and Dawn Lavoie, of the SE Region, and Matthew Andersen, Deputy Director of USGS National Wetlands Research Center, reviewed the Task Force Restoration Strategy document and provided comments during a conference call on June 15, 2011. NWRC scientist Gregory Steyer also continues to be heavily involved in this process, and is one of the three USGS personnel (along with Daussman and Lavoie) who has been named to the Task Force committees along with EPA and NOAA personnel. (Matthew Andersen; Lafayette, La., 337-266-8501)

Notable Congressional Activity

  • On June 10, 2011, David Wegner, staff director for the subcommittee on Water and Power of the U.S. House Natural Resources Committee, requested a copy of the new land change map that the USGS National Wetlands Research Center has just released. (Phil Turnipseed; Lafayette, La.; 337-266-8655)           

Press Inquiries/Media - Newspapers/magazines/wires, etc.

  • USGS maps 1,883 square miles of last coast in Louisiana (The Republic; Columbus, IN.; June 3, 2011) “Despite a decline in the rate of coastal wetland loss in the past 25 years, Louisiana has experienced a net loss of 1,883 square miles since 1932, according to a U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center report.” (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

  • Changing Louisiana wetlands revealed (The Daily Advertiser; Lafayette, La.; June 2, 2011) “Coastal Louisiana has lost a wetland area the size of Delaware, equaling 1,883 square miles, over the past 78 years, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center study.” (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

  • Losing ground less quickly (Hammond Star; Hammond, La.; June 6, 2011) “The USGS National Wetlands Research Center is cautiously optimistic about the decline in the rate of coastal wetland loss, but the findings cited in the center's latest report are good news.” (Phil Turnipseed; Lafayette, La.; 337-266-8655)

  • Mapping the Future – and Past (The Independent Weekly; Lafayette, La.; June 8, 2011) “A new coastal map produced by the National Wetlands Research Center in Lafayette has a variety of applications locally and worldwide.” (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

  • USGS National Wetlands Research Center Branch Chief Thomas Doyle was quoted in the editorial section of the Baton Rouge Advocate on June 9, 2011 as a quote of interest. In his quote, he reminded people that a flood "other than its threat to human life and infrastructure, is part of the lifeblood and dynamics of the flood plain that rejuvenates it." (Thomas Doyle; Lafayette, La.; 337-266-8647)

  • River flood builds land, but will it help locally? (Daily Comet; Thibodaux, La.; June 11, 2011) “‘The real tragedy of this flood is that it isn't getting sediment to some of these areas that sorely need it,’ said Phillip Turnipseed, director of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Wetlands Research Center, which published the satellite photos of the flood.” 

  • Wetlands map reveals south La.'s coastline losses (Tri-Parish Times; Houma, La.; June 16, 2011) “A new map produced by the U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center has confirmed that during a 78-year period between 1932 and 2010, roughly 1,883 square miles, or 25 percent of Louisiana's wetlands have been lost to combined elements of erosion due to tropical storms and hurricanes as well as coastal cutting by industry, the construction of certain dams and levees and most significantly the rerouting of major waterways including the Mississippi River following the great flood of 1927 that robbed the region of needed sediment for prolonged survival.” (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

Press Inquiries/Media - Broadcast and Film

  • USGS Report on La. Coastal Loss (WRKF 89.3 NPR; Baton Rouge, La.; June 3, 2011) “The US Geological Survey says Louisiana is losing a football field of wetlands per hour. According to the USGS study Louisiana has lost almost 1,900 square miles of wetlands over the past 78 years.” (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

  • USGS National Wetlands Research Center geographer Brady Couvillion was contacted on June 9, 2011, by a producer for Louisiana Public Broadcasting who was working on a Louisiana bicentennial project called “Then and Now.” She requested information regarding coastal land loss since 2005. Couvillion provided the information. (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

Press Inquiries/Media - Online

  • USGS Scientist Wins National Wildlife Federation Award (Sound Waves; June 2011) “Currently based in Many, Louisiana, Burkett was formerly Chief of the Forest Ecology Branch at the USGS National Wetlands Research Center in Lafayette, Louisiana.” (Virginia Burkett; Many, La.; 318-256-5628)

  • CPRA Comments On Federal Land Loss Report Released Today (CPRA Newsroom; June 2, 2011) “Today, the United States Geological Survey's National Wetlands Research Center released a new report on coastal Louisiana land loss.” (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

  • New Study Confirms Significant Land Loss Along Louisiana Coast (AmmoLand.com; June 3, 2011) “Coastal Louisiana has lost more than 1.2 million acres in the past 78 years, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center.” (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

  • USGS: Coastal Louisiana has lost a wetland area the size of Delaware, New Map Shows Losses and Gains Since 1932 (YubaNet.com; June 3, 2011) “Coastal Louisiana has lost a wetland area the size of Delaware, equaling 1,883 square miles, over the past 78 years, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center study.” (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

  • Associated Press Image (Yahoo News; June 4, 2011) “Despite a decline in the rate of coastal wetland loss in the past 25 years, Louisiana has experienced a net loss of 1,883 square miles since 1932, according to a U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center report.” (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

  • New Study Confirms Significant Land Loss Along Louisiana Coast (The Outdoor Wire; June 6, 2011) “Coastal Louisiana has lost more than 1.2 million acres in the past 78 years, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center.” (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

  • Studies spy on a river’s rage (Nature News; June 14, 2011) “The US Geological Survey says that nearly 43 square kilometres of Lousiana's coastal marshes have been disappearing each year since 1985, owing to sea-level rise, subsidence and sediment deficit.”  (Karen McKee; Lafayette, La., 337-266-8662)

  • River flood builds land, but will it help locally? (WWLTV.com; New Orleans, La.; June 12, 2011) “‘The real tragedy of this flood is that it isn't getting sediment to some of these areas that sorely need it,’ said Phillip Turnipseed, director of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Wetlands Research Center, which published the satellite photos of the flood.” (Phil Turnipseed; Lafayette, La.; 337-266-8501)

  • River flood builds land, but will it help locally? (Association of State Wetland Managers; June 13, 2011) “‘The real tragedy of this flood is that it isn't getting sediment to some of these areas that sorely need it,’ said Phillip Turnipseed, director of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Wetlands Research Center, which published the satellite photos of the flood.” (Phil Turnipseed; Lafayette, La.; 337-266-8501)

  • How Are Louisiana Wetlands Changed Over Time? New Map Shows Losses and Gains Since 1932 (GOMA Environmental Education Network Listserve; June 14, 2011) “Coastal Louisiana has lost a wetland area the size of Delaware, equaling 1,883 square miles, over the past 78 years, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center study.” (Brady Couvillion; Baton Rouge, La., 225-578-7484)

  • Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) - New Products (GOMA Environmental Education Network Listserve; June 14, 2011) “  In 2003 the CWPPRA Task Force granted approval to the Louisiana Office of Coastal Protection and Restoration (OCPR) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the implementation of the Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS) in coastal Louisiana.” (Gregory Steyer; Baton Rouge, La., 25-578-7201)

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